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point if you remember, the president was hoping he could get a debt ceiling deal tied to the fiscal cliff negotiation. that didn't happen. the republicans gave up that negotiation. but they're hoping that the debt ceiling raising will give them the leverage that they need to get what they want when it comes to spending cuts. the president hopes though that he can by delegitimizing this idea of having the debt ceiling as a debate, have them have no leverage going into the deficit-cutting discussion or at least a lot less leverage. >> bill: the other big topic, the only other topic actually raised at the news conference yesterday other than whether or not you elect a party, president likes to have a party. was the issue of guns where the president was not specific because he hasn't seen -- or wasn't ready to list all of the recommendations that may have come out of the biden task force. but the president did express and repeat his resolve to do something about this issue of gun violence. no doubt about that, was there? >> no. while he put off getting into the details a little bit, he
're going to face it again, you know, debt ceiling stuff, what is the republican strategy in dealing with the democrats? david. >> you know, mike, i was on capitol hill this week talking to top republicans, and i'm getting a sense and you're seeing it written about as well, that they would maybe like to step away from the brink about the debt ceiling. they do want to force the issue about how can they get this president to agree to additional spending cuts? the debt ceiling is a dangerous game. i think they recognize that politically. they'll push -- the question is how -- how do they push on the debt ceiling? do they say, look, we'll give you a short-term extension of the debt ceiling for a certain amount of spending cuts, or we'll give you a long-term extension like you want for even more spending cuts. can they force entitlement reform around medicare, for instance, even some of the -- in their view -- more limited things that the president wants to do around means testing and age and indexing to try to attach that to a debt-limit deal. do they move beyond the debt limit, try to g
that this deal now would have to include an extension of the debt ceiling that they just got to avoid the fiscal cliff. well, he ultimately folded on that. so as a tactical matter, even in their minority position, they can look at this and see, well, there is some gain to be gotten here if we keep pushing on this. i think the flip side of this is also a big challenge for the president. if he really wants to unshackle the economy, if he wants to get more robust economic growth, does he not want to be more proactive about dealing with some of these entitlements, with dealing with the budget picture, even where he has real problems with his supposed, you know, partners in this to republicans? does he not want to take advantage of the power he has to try to advance this, to get more robust economic growth independent of his misgivings about his partners here on capitol hill. >> chuck, i think it's fair to say that harry reid was somewhat marginalized during negotiation biden sort of swooped in to save the day. what do you see as his role going forward as we edge toward these upcoming fiscal cliffs?
supporters would like. so they are putting it right back on congress, you've got to deal with this debt ceiling issue and they think they can win that argument. obviously we're going to hear questions about guns. we flknow that the president's people say he is committed to the assault weapons ban, magazine ban on the magazines and also to background checks, whether or not those and other issues can get through, they don't think that there's much he can do by executive action. >> andrea mitchell, see you at 1:00. thanks for joining me. >> thanks, thomas. >>> want to take you back now to the white house. peter alexander is standing by now. now we're getting word the press conference has been pushed back to 11:40. just to give people behind the curtains look here. 11:15 and then 11:30 and now 11:40. i'm saying hi noon. >> high noon sounds good in is often the way this plays out. this morning it came as a surprise to most of the in the white house press corp. was was taking place tonight. he hadn't been given a head unthere would be a news conference with the today until just this morning.
come out and said that if washington doesn't deal with the debt ceiling, they could be downgrading the united states, the watch for that. once again the debt ceiling. i want to point out one thing. the last time we went -- whole drama about the debt ceiling, we got downgraded, do you know what happened to the interest rates? they went down dramatically. yeah. the -- treasury market actually went up. happened to be the same time that europe was going through its crisis. and -- the safest investment in the world seen at the time is still by many people in the world is the u.s. government debt despite the huge amounts of it we continue to borrow. >> are you still traveling around the world? >> yeah. i'm the chief international correspondent. fourth quarter was dominated by domestic news. i did travel in the fourth quarter. we are waiting to see if the italian elections with berlusconi should be interesting. waiting for chavez the die. >> that should be a party. >> always interesting. >> come back when you can. >> if you can stick around as much as possible so we don't have to talk to
deficit reduction deals that were contingent upon or in the context of raising the debt ceiling. you, yourself, four times have done that. three times, those were related to deficit reduction or budget maneuvers. what chuck and i and i think many people are curious about is this new, adamant desire on your part not to negotiate, when that seems to conflict with the entire history in the modern era of american presidents and the debt ceiling, and your own history on the debt ceiling. and doesn't that suggest that we are going to go into a default situation because no one is talking to each other about how to resolve this? >> well, no, major, i think if you look at the history, getting votes for the debt ceiling is always difficult, and budgets in this town are always difficult. i went through this just last year. but what's different is we never saw a situation as we saw last year in which certain groups in congress took such an absolutist position that we came within a few days of defaulting. and the fact of the matter is, is that we have never seen the debt ceiling used in this fash
ahead of debt ceiling conversations, days after fiscal quick negotiations -- days after fiscal cliff negotiations. was that deal good for poor people? >> for 30 years, we have not addressed this issue, except for the wonderful work that you and cornel are doing in these wonderful people on the panel. politics has neglected the poor. one could say that there was a war on the poor rather than a war on poverty for much of this period. the united states has by far the most poverty of any of the high- income countries as a share of the population. we have the highest in quality. we have the most entrenched underclass. we have had the biggest increases of any quality by far, and we've had the least political response of any high- income countries, so we are standing out on our own. this has been a 30-year trend of soaring in comes at the top, stagnation in the middle, and falling through the floor on the bottom, and the political system has refused to address this for 30 years. so we have reached a calamitous situation in this country, but the fact of the matter is nothing that was done at
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7